All posts by Shawna Coronado

How to Get Large Hosta Leaves

Hosta and HeucheraHosta plants are fantastic for shady gardens. I have hundreds of them in my own Midwestern garden and love the amazing variety of hostas, either bare root or potted that are offered on Jung Seeds Website.

These tough little plants can survive drought, but prefer a moist, loamy soil whenever possible. In the northern states the foliage collapses when cold weather hits, but the little leaves will pop up out of the ground reliably in the spring. In order to have the best success with hosta plants, I simply plant them and ignore them except for an occasional water. Dividing of a hosta is not necessary unless the plant becomes overcrowded.

Beets for Greens

Beet Greens When I was growing up on a farm in Indiana, my most important dinner table goal was avoiding beets and brussels sprouts. Who could have known that I would grow up to love them with such a passion?

Beets make one of the most fantastic ornamental edibles to mix in with flower containers and work well in a cool season garden or for successive planting. Generally grown for their root, the beet green is my favorite part – it’s ornamental above ground and can be harvested for a delicious salad several times throughout the season.

How to Grow Purple Broccoli

Purple Broccoli Photo © Shawna CoronadoBroccoli is one of the healthiest vegetables – it is full of nutritious vitamins and is excellent roughage for a healthy diet.

This season I experimented with Summer Purple Sprouting Broccoli, which produced amazing purple flower buds which were very tasty and produced a continuous stream of veg. I left the plant up and harvested the tops in snips and starts until I’d exhausted each plant’s summer growing season.

Poinsettia Ball Container Design

Christmas Container Garden Poinsetta Balls

December can be filled with snow and mud – we garden addicts are needing a garden-fix in a bad way. Creating some amazing container gardens to display in a sunny window is a must. Try planting these amazing poinsettia ball containers which I originally spotted at the Chicago Botanic Garden greenhouse.

Make the balls small or large and give your holiday guests something creative to talk about for the holiday season.

How To Make Hanging Poinsettia Balls –Hanging Basket with Holes

  1. Find or make a garden container that has holes on the bottom and sides (see photo right of an example)

Easy on Your Back Gardening

Garden Hack to Move BagsJung Seed knows that gardening can be tough on your back, particularly if you have a condition like spinal osteoarthritis like I do. Moving bags of soil and other large items can easily aggravate or injure your backs and joints. Coming up with an easy solution to help in the garden was as simple as finding an old blanket.

Put the blanket on the ground and gently load it with the large items you need to move. Carefully pull the item around the garden or yard until you have reached your destination – it is much easier than a wheelbarrow and is a quick and easy fix.

Plant Herbs in a Mason Jar

Therapeutic Mason Jar Garden Shawna
While it’s the end of the in-ground garden season for many, it is also the beginning of the fall growing season. Why not plant up some of those herbs from your garden in mason jars to have through the fall and winter? If you don’t have herb plants, no problem, order some herb seeds from Jung Seed and grow all through the winter.

In order to grow herbs in a mason jar, drill a hole in the mason jar with a glass drill bit in order to allow better drainage, mix some soil and organic fertilizer together and plant your plant or place the seeds at the top of the soil and gently press in. Water regularly. Easy as 1-2-3 (see video below).

Grow Native Butterfly Weed Plant

Native - Butterfly Weed 2Native plants are amazing — they require no fertilizer, no soil amendment, and no drama. Butterfly weed or asclepias tuberosa, is especially beautiful in the garden whether it is planted among native plants or blended in with your more traditional perennial beds. Once established the plant requires no watering and no attention.

Without a doubt this is a drought tolerant plant that is suited to harsh conditions, but the best benefit of this plant is it’s Monarch Butterfly attracting quality. Help save the butterflies with a little butterfly weed love planted in your garden this season. Watch the video below to see how easy it is to plant the butterfly weed in your garden.

How to Harvest Vegetables in a No-Till Garden

Food Pantry VegetablesOne of the goals of a no-till garden is leave the soil undisturbed whenever possible. In a traditional garden, the end-of-season vegetables get uprooted, usually with the soil pulled out along with it, then the soil is turned over to aerate it. In a no-till garden, it is important NOT to destroy the microbes in the soil. Keeping most of the vegetable roots in the ground at the end of the season means the microbes will stay put and will not be destroyed.

10 Fall Vegetable Seeds to Start Now

Beet Greens

At the beginning of the year we discussed spring seed starting and now it is fall seed planting season. Typically, you need to start your fall seeds 10 to 12 weeks before your first frost date. Read labels carefully as this time frame is a generalization and you might need more or less time in the growing process. Below is a great list to get started planting this summer for great eats all fall.

10 Fall Vegetable Seed Varieties —

  1. Arugula
  2. Cabbage
  3. Cauliflower
  4. Broccoli
  5. Purple Mustard Greens
  6. Rutabaga
  7. Radish

Pinch a Coleus

Coleus and Thai BasilColeus has always been one of my favorite plants because of all the bold foliage combinations and the joyous way it seems to combine with herbs and vegetables. Those colors, in particular, make it easy to love whether planted in beds or containers.

HOW TO PINCH A COLEUS:

  1. Place the stem of the plant, just above the top leaves, between your thumb and finger. Dig your fingernail firmly into the stem, pinching the stem completely off the plant in the center of the V where the leaves come together.