Tag Archives: gardening

How to Get Large Hosta Leaves

Hosta and HeucheraHosta plants are fantastic for shady gardens. I have hundreds of them in my own Midwestern garden and love the amazing variety of hostas, either bare root or potted that are offered on Jung Seeds Website.

These tough little plants can survive drought, but prefer a moist, loamy soil whenever possible. In the northern states the foliage collapses when cold weather hits, but the little leaves will pop up out of the ground reliably in the spring. In order to have the best success with hosta plants, I simply plant them and ignore them except for an occasional water. Dividing of a hosta is not necessary unless the plant becomes overcrowded.

Beets for Greens

Beet Greens When I was growing up on a farm in Indiana, my most important dinner table goal was avoiding beets and brussels sprouts. Who could have known that I would grow up to love them with such a passion?

Beets make one of the most fantastic ornamental edibles to mix in with flower containers and work well in a cool season garden or for successive planting. Generally grown for their root, the beet green is my favorite part – it’s ornamental above ground and can be harvested for a delicious salad several times throughout the season.

How to Grow Purple Broccoli

Purple Broccoli Photo © Shawna CoronadoBroccoli is one of the healthiest vegetables – it is full of nutritious vitamins and is excellent roughage for a healthy diet.

This season I experimented with Summer Purple Sprouting Broccoli, which produced amazing purple flower buds which were very tasty and produced a continuous stream of veg. I left the plant up and harvested the tops in snips and starts until I’d exhausted each plant’s summer growing season.

Easy on Your Back Gardening

Garden Hack to Move BagsJung Seed knows that gardening can be tough on your back, particularly if you have a condition like spinal osteoarthritis like I do. Moving bags of soil and other large items can easily aggravate or injure your backs and joints. Coming up with an easy solution to help in the garden was as simple as finding an old blanket.

Put the blanket on the ground and gently load it with the large items you need to move. Carefully pull the item around the garden or yard until you have reached your destination – it is much easier than a wheelbarrow and is a quick and easy fix.

How to Harvest Vegetables in a No-Till Garden

Food Pantry VegetablesOne of the goals of a no-till garden is leave the soil undisturbed whenever possible. In a traditional garden, the end-of-season vegetables get uprooted, usually with the soil pulled out along with it, then the soil is turned over to aerate it. In a no-till garden, it is important NOT to destroy the microbes in the soil. Keeping most of the vegetable roots in the ground at the end of the season means the microbes will stay put and will not be destroyed.

10 Fall Vegetable Seeds to Start Now

Beet Greens

At the beginning of the year we discussed spring seed starting and now it is fall seed planting season. Typically, you need to start your fall seeds 10 to 12 weeks before your first frost date. Read labels carefully as this time frame is a generalization and you might need more or less time in the growing process. Below is a great list to get started planting this summer for great eats all fall.

10 Fall Vegetable Seed Varieties —

  1. Arugula
  2. Cabbage
  3. Cauliflower
  4. Broccoli
  5. Purple Mustard Greens
  6. Rutabaga
  7. Radish

Pinch a Coleus

Coleus and Thai BasilColeus has always been one of my favorite plants because of all the bold foliage combinations and the joyous way it seems to combine with herbs and vegetables. Those colors, in particular, make it easy to love whether planted in beds or containers.

HOW TO PINCH A COLEUS:

  1. Place the stem of the plant, just above the top leaves, between your thumb and finger. Dig your fingernail firmly into the stem, pinching the stem completely off the plant in the center of the V where the leaves come together.

How to Cut Back Naturalized Bulb Stems

Pink tulipsTulips, daffodils, and hyacinths are perennial plants that bloom in the spring. Many people want to cut the stems and clear the area immediately after the flower has stopped blooming, but in order to have them come back in a naturalized fashion next year, it is important to help them develop a stronger bulb and root system.

First, snip out the flower stem once it is done blooming so seed does not form. Then leave the rest of the plant alone until the leaves have browned and fallen to the ground. At that time you can rake the plant’s leaves up. If the unsightly browning is disturbing to you, simply wait until the leaves are wilting and mostly yellow, then cut them until only a small portion remains above the ground.

Plant a Zinnia

Orange ZinniaThere is still time left to plant your Jung Seed zinnia seeds in the cutting garden which, with luck and an Indian Summer, can bloom straight on into late October. Beyond smiling every time you see a zinnia, they are astoundingly great bee and butterfly attracters which are hardy through a few frosts and totally drought tolerant.

Follow package directions for direct sowing zinnia seeds into the garden soil, making sure to amend the soil so it is loose and filled with fertile organic matter so that it drains well. Be sure to water zinnias at the base of the plant to prevent powdery mildew.