2017 Catalog Sneak Peek

We have welcomed a week of mild weather here in Wisconsin while we are hard at work finalizing our 2017 catalog and preparing for next season. We’re excited about the upcoming season and are pleased to be able to offer a range of interesting new items to our customers. Here is a sneak preview of a few selected additions for 2017.

Featured New Varieties for 2017

squash-chiffon

Chiffon Hybrid summer squash is a unique new summer squash with attractive, creamy ivory skin. Its straight fruit develop seeds very slowly, allowing even extra-large fruit to be enjoyed without the need to scoop out seeds! The plants are very productive and are resistant to cucumber mosaic virus.

Winter Care for Roses

 rose-dick-clark-grandiflora
Rose Hardiness

Roses vary quite a bit in their cold hardiness across different rose classes and even among different varieties in the same class. Gardeners in cold climates should take care to select varieties appropriate for their hardiness zone, to minimize the need for extensive winter protection.

All but the hardiest shrub roses may require protection when grown in cold climates where winter temperatures fall below 0°F (zone 7 and below). With good variety choice, gardeners in zone 6 and above usually do not need to make significant efforts to protect roses in winter.

Growing Amaryllis

amaryllis

Introduction

Amaryllis (Hippeastrum species) is a tender perennial bulb native to Central and South America. It is commonly grown as a houseplant or indoor-outdoor potted plant. Only in very mild climates (zone 8 or warmer) can it be grown outside year round.

Few houseplants can equal or rival the beauty of amaryllis, with its large, lily-like flowers. Varieties are available in a range of heights, flower colors, and flower forms.

Although sometimes treated as a disposable gift plant, amaryllis is actually a long-lived bulb that will grow and flower for many years after planting when given the proper care throughout the season.

How to Combat Warty Skinned Potatoes

Wondering what’s wrong with your plant? We love talking plants and are always happy to help with any gardening related questions!

Question: “We love our red skin potatoes, but not the little warts on the skins. The potatoes we get at the store are nice and smooth. What I’m I doing wrong? We live in North Wisconsin with clay soil, which I try to amend with mulch to loosen it up.”

potato-red-pontiac

Answer: The “warty” skin on your red potatoes is probably caused by a disease called potato scab. Though this disease doesn’t reduce yields, it does make potatoes unsightly.

Fall Garden Chores

img_1842

Both leaves and temperatures are falling here in Wisconsin, and it’s time for most of the country to think about finishing the of the last garden chores as winter draws ever closer.

Tool Cleanup & Storage
An important fall chore is cleaning and storing tools and garden equipment, to ensure that everything is accessible and ready for use when needed in spring. Proper care of tools will also significantly prolong their useful life.

Wash any soil residue from garden tools or remove it with a wire brush. Remove any rust spots that have developed on metal surfaces with a wire brush, fine grained sandpaper, or steel wool.

Growing & Harvesting Garlic

silver-rose-garlic

Home grown, properly harvested and stored garlic provides a fresh flavor that can’t be matched by any supermarket garlic. Garlic is a relatively easy-to-grow, hardy perennial vegetable, though it has a fairly long production season. It is a crop well worth considering for your garden.

Types of Garlic

There are two main types of garlic, softneck and hardneck (sometimes called “stiff neck”) forms. Softneck varieties are commonly available in supermarkets. They generally produce more cloves per bulb and store better than hardneck types. Hardneck garlic produces a stiff central flowering stem, while softneck varieties generally do not produce this stem, making the leaves easier to braid. Hardneck varieties are generally more cold tolerant than softneck types and are often considered “gourmet” garlic.

Easy on Your Back Gardening

Garden Hack to Move BagsJung Seed knows that gardening can be tough on your back, particularly if you have a condition like spinal osteoarthritis like I do. Moving bags of soil and other large items can easily aggravate or injure your backs and joints. Coming up with an easy solution to help in the garden was as simple as finding an old blanket.

Put the blanket on the ground and gently load it with the large items you need to move. Carefully pull the item around the garden or yard until you have reached your destination – it is much easier than a wheelbarrow and is a quick and easy fix.

Plant Herbs in a Mason Jar

Therapeutic Mason Jar Garden Shawna
While it’s the end of the in-ground garden season for many, it is also the beginning of the fall growing season. Why not plant up some of those herbs from your garden in mason jars to have through the fall and winter? If you don’t have herb plants, no problem, order some herb seeds from Jung Seed and grow all through the winter.

In order to grow herbs in a mason jar, drill a hole in the mason jar with a glass drill bit in order to allow better drainage, mix some soil and organic fertilizer together and plant your plant or place the seeds at the top of the soil and gently press in. Water regularly. Easy as 1-2-3 (see video below).